Gender Pay Gap Report

What is the Gender Pay Gap report?

From 6 April 2017 organisations with more than 250 employees were required by the Government Equalities Office to publish annually gender pay data on the following basis:

  • Gender pay gap (mean and median averages)
  • Gender bonus gap (mean and median averages)
  • Proportion of men and women receiving bonuses
  • Proportion of men and women in each quartile of the organisation’s pay structure

The 2019 data must be reported on by April 2020. The above data for the University of Winchester is shown in the attached table. All the data relates to the year ending 31st March 2019. This is the third gender pay gap report published by the new statutory requirement since its introduction in 2017.

It is important to state from the outset that a gender pay gap is not the same as equal pay. A gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between the average salaries of male and female employees across an organisation, whereas equal pay refers to the legal requirement for employers to pay male and female employees the same for undertaking the same or similar work, Therefore, it is possible for an organisation to have a gender pay gap despite it being fully compliant with its equal pay responsibilities.

The University of Winchester is committed to ensuring that all its staff, irrespective of their gender, have an equal opportunity to fulfil their career aspirations during their time here. The statistics in this report show that the University has a gender pay gap in favour of male employees, but there has been a reduction in the size of this gap from our 2018 figures.  We have data that demonstrates that this is largely due to our in-sourcing policy, but we are committed as an organisation to identifying and implementing practical steps to make a further reduction in our pay gap in the future.

2019

 Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2019

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

11.0%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

16.2%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

47.1%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

53.3%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.3%

0.5%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

47.1%

52.9%

Upper Middle

59.4%

40.6%

Lower Middle

62.1%

37.9%

Lower

69.4%

30.6%

For the University of Winchester the mean gender pay gap figure for 2019 has reduced to 11.0% from 11.7%, the previous year. whereas the median gender pay gap has remained constant at 16.2%.

The principal reason for our gender pay gap in favour of our male employees is that we are one of a minority of universities who have retained catering and cleaning services in-house. We consider that our employees who provide these services are fully committed to and aligned with the University’s values, whereas this would not be the case if these services were provided by an external contractor. We are unapologetic about our preference to retain these services in-house, whilst acknowledging that as they are dominated by part-time female employees on our lower salary grades they have a huge impact on our gender pay gap. Most other universities are exempt from this impact through outsourcing these services.

The major impact of in-house provision of catering and cleaning services on the size of our gender pay gap is demonstrated by the statistics that our gender pay gap for our academic staff is only 3.2% at the mean and non-existent at the median.

As a consequence of the gender imbalance across the University’s grade structure, female employees are over-represented in the lower pay quartile and under-represented in the highest pay quartile. It is this gender imbalance in the highest and lowest pay quartiles which accounts for our gender pay gap.

Part time working is a key factor in explaining our gender pay gap. 51.0% of our female employees are part-time compared to only 27.1% of our male employees. The biggest concentration of part-time workers are on our lowest five pay grades. 49.4% of employees on these grades are part-time. This is in stark contrast to our two highest grades where only 24.5% of employees are part-time. What these figures show is a strong correlation between female employees and part-time working, coupled with a strong concentration of part-time jobs on the lower pay grades. This indicates the key impact of part-time jobs on the size of our gender pay gap.

The main reason we can identify for our median pay gap being higher than our mean pay gap is that three of the four highest paid employees at the census date were female and this has a significant impact in making the mean hourly rate of pay for female employees higher than it would otherwise be. The methodology for calculating the median hourly rate of pay is such that these salaries have a negligible impact on the median rate.

Whilst the statutory reporting duty also requires organisations to report their gender pay gap on bonus pay this is a far less relevant statistic for the University of Winchester than the hourly rate of pay as bonuses are not an integral part of our employee remuneration practices. Bonus payments, in the form of an honoraria payment for an exceptional contribution or achievement were paid to only 10 staff in the year of reference. Our pay gap statistics for bonuses are not very meaningful as they are based on such low numbers. 8 of the 10 staff receiving bonuses were female, but the average size of bonus for the 2 male staff who received one was greater.

2018

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2018

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

11.7%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

16.2%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

25.7%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

29.8%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.4%

1.0%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

47.6%

52.4%

Upper Middle

60.6%

39.4%

Lower Middle

65.0%

35.0%

Lower

68.2%

31.8%



2017

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2017

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

13.8%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

22.0%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

50.7%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

25.0%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.5%

1.6%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

46.5%

53.5%

Upper Middle

61.2%

38.8%

Lower Middle

67.7%

32.3%

Lower

70.7%

29.3%

 

Looking Forward

We are committed to taking steps to address any barriers we identify to female career progression which are within our ability to influence. We are about to develop a gender pay gap action plan, with input from our recognised trade unions. We are aiming to finalise the action plan by April 2020.

It remains the case that in the UK it is predominantly women who take primary responsibility for child care. Unless and until this societal norm changes women will continue to be the dominant gender in part-time jobs, which tend to be lower-paid roles. Therefore, to some extent it is the pace at which this societal norm weakens which will make the critical difference in our further efforts to narrow and ultimately eliminate the gender pay gap.