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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Classical Studies achieved 100% overall satisfaction as rated by final-year undergraduate students in the 2019 National Student Survey
  • Get out of the library on organised field trips to Fishbourne Roman Palace and the British Museum, and placements in art galleries and museums
  • Work with experts in the fields of Roman and Greek history, Classical literature and drama, and Roman and Greek art and archaeology
  • Cover a range of exciting topics from the Minoans and the Bronze Age to Murder in the Classical City, and from Roman Sport and Leisure through to the Classical inheritance of the early medieval world and beyond
  • Hone your ability to understand and work in multicultural environments — highly valued by employers

The ancient Greek and Roman worlds have given us an extraordinarily rich heritage of culture, literature, politics, philosophy, art, architecture and archaeology as well as paving the way for democracy, modern day sewers, underfloor heating and the calendar. Whatever you aspire to become – and Classical Studies students have conquered most fields – an understanding of the classical past gives you a keen lens through which to view the modern world. 

Our BA in Classical Studies takes an innovative, multidisciplinary dive into this fascinating cultural and intellectual history. You gain a critical yet empathetic appreciation of different worldviews on a course that blends study of history, literature, drama, philosophy, archaeology, art and architecture. Knowledge of Classical languages is not required, but opportunities to learn and develop your language skills may be on offer.

The course contextualises and enriches the study of these disciplines through, theoretical, research and vocational elements. You explore the world of the Greeks and the Romans in both historical and contemporary contexts and so come to a new understanding of the world around us.

Our programme considers the reception of the Classical world from the medieval through to the modern world. You interact with the Classical world through field trips to Fishbourne Roman Palace and the British Museum, through modules in Neo-Classicism and through volunteer placement opportunities in the heritage sector.

Study begins by establishing a framework of Classical history, both chronologically and geographically. You are introduced to Classical archaeology, art and architecture (for example, temples, sculpture and inscriptions); Classical drama (comedy and tragedy), and literature (epics and lyrics).

Next, in Year 2, you explore the nature of history as a discipline and its changing assumptions, methods and definitions. You choose from a range of modules covering civilisation, archaeology and history including the high point of Athenian democracy and the Classical Greek world, death and ritual in the ancient world and the world of Alexander the Great. In Year 2, you may also undertake a volunteer placement in a museum or art gallery, go on a week-long field trip to sites relevant to the Classical world, or take part in our Study Abroad exchange with a university in America or Bulgaria.

In the final year, you hone your research methods, write a dissertation and undertake more specialised modules that focus on the Pax Romana, the archaeology of Roman Italy, Minoan art and architecture, or Greek and Roman comedy.

After three years you’ll have a grounding in the political, cultural, and economic basics of the Greek and Roman worlds that lends itself to understanding how we continue to interact with the Classical world in our modern society. The skills you cultivate on your modules – time management, critical reading and writing skills, independent thinking and public speaking – transfer readily to today’s workplace.

As such, our graduates are valued in a wide variety of occupations including business, law and accountancy, the civil service, local government and social services. Others teach or write for television, film and radio.

Some of our graduates go on to postgraduate work, and often study MA degrees in related subjects, such as classical archaeology, ancient history and Latin languages and literature. Becoming a specialist is the first step towards pursuing an academic career as a lecturer or researcher.

Find out more about the Department for History

Careers

Graduates work in a wide range of careers within the civil service, local government and social services, business and retail management, law enforcement and the armed forces.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Field trips

Students have the opportunity to undertake field trips, for example to Fishbourne Roman Palace, and placements, for example, to art galleries and the British Museum.

Study abroad

Our BA (Hons) Classical Studies course provides an opportunity for you to study abroad in the United States of America. For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours

Independent learning: 984 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours

Independent learning: 960 hours

Placement: 24 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours

Independent learning: 960 hours

Placement: 24 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Students become part of a community of students and scholars. All academics pride themselves on the quality of their teaching and their commitment to tapping and developing students' academic potential. Every effort is made to ensure that staff are available to students should advice be required and believe ourselves to be approachable and accessible.

Teaching is student-centred and designed to develop increasingly independent learners as students progress through the three or four years of the degree. A broad foundation at the start of the course sets out the chronology and civilisation of the Classical world and introduces students to the relevant disciplines to study it - art, archaeology, architecture, drama, history, literature and philosophy. These themes are developed thereafter in Year 2, which also explores the legacy of the Classics, and are studied more intensively during Year 3 and 4.

In Year 1, the majority of learning and teaching is delivered through lectures although there are many group discussions and small group learning. During the programme, the emphasis is increasingly placed on the exploration, development and communication of students' own views in seminars and tutorials.

All Classical Studies students are encouraged to take the Winchester Passport. The Winchester Passport rewards students for taking part in activities which develop employability skills. Students typically undertake volunteering or a targeted work placement tailored to student interests.

Key features of the student experience are:

  • The opportunity to undertake the University of Winchester's Research Apprenticeship Programme (WRAP) which engages students in work with academics on a genuine research project (e.g. categorising inscriptions), so that they engage first-hand in cutting-edge scholarly activity and build vital transferable skills for the future
  • Established exchanges with partner institutions in the USA and Europe
  • Field trips to enhance student's knowledge and understanding with practical experiences
  • Variety of work and volunteer placements to both national and local institutions

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used can be found by attending an Open Day.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

96% coursework
0% written exams
4% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

68% coursework
24% written exams
8% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

54% coursework
32% written exams
14% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2021 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE C or 4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: Year 0/Level 3: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Case Studies I: Sources and Approaches to History 15

This module introduces students to the core skills required to study history successfully at degree level. History makes sense of the past by analysing surviving evidence. Such evidence is either secondary, which requires in-depth critical reading, or primary or original, which demands critical contextualisation and analysis. All such evidence has uses to the historian, not necessarily obvious, and all contains partiality, which historians are trained to overcome. Working in small groups with one staff member per group, there will be a balance between developing awareness of these overarching core skills (such as conducting research and mastering referencing conventions) and a case study where students work on academic reading connected to a particular topic. This intensive small group environment will help students adjust to the university environment and provide a venue for delivering other transitional and transferrable skills.

Case Studies II: Independent Study Project 15

This module builds upon Sources & Approaches in History, further developing students’ skills as independent researchers, and giving students an opportunity to do research of a critical nature, using both primary and secondary sources. Continuing to work in the same Case Study groups and topic as they did in Sources & Approaches, students undertake an individual research project, on a topic negotiated with a tutor. In addition, there will be an element of group work as students combine their individual findings, presenting on a subtopic of the module’s overarching theme. As this module concentrates upon developing skills there is an emphasis on training for future employment. Students will be expected to engage with careers service activities in semester 2 and to report their activities in a reflective blog.

Introduction to the Classical Greek World 15

This course presents an introduction to, and an examination of, life in classical Greece. Focussing on ancient Athens, where possible, we shall review the city’s rise to power and how that success was complemented by Athens’ emergence as a key site of great art and culture in the ancient world. Why Athens, of all cities? To try and answer that question we shall also consider the broader social and cultural forces that helped to shape the classical city. This is a foundational module that seeks to connect the different parts of life in the ancient Athens, even as it introduces students to the knowledge and skills required for future study of antiquity.

Introduction to Classical Greek Literature 15

This module provides the students with a general introduction to the main literary genres of the Classical Greek world. The timeframe considered is approximately from the eight century BC to the second century BC (from the Homeric epics to the literature of the Hellenistic and Imperial age). This survey of literary material can include epic poetry, lyric poetry, oratory, historiography, epigram, and other major literary genres. The goal is for students to become familiar with the different forms of literature found in Classical Greek sources and to be able to identify the distinguishing elements of each literary genre. At the same time, this module provides the students with an opportunity to become familiar with the best-known practitioners of each literary genre in ancient Greece. The module may also make forays into how these literary forms influenced later writing in the Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and modern world.

Introduction to Classical Archaeology 15

The module will introduce the study of classical archaeology, and the methodologies and approaches that distinguish it from classical history and other branches of classical studies. It is thematically based, covering topics such as social structure, economics, urbanism, religion and military affairs. Material culture, such as weapons, coins, pottery, villas, fortifications, etc., will be explored, and the contribution it makes to classical archaeology assessed.

Introduction to the Classical Roman World 15

The study of Roman civilisation is the historical and cultural study of a wealth of events, individuals, cultures, monuments, landscapes, and sources of evidence. This module is an introduction to the Romans in Britain, beginning with pre-Roman settlement and culture. We will examine ancient sources carefully, both written and material; the course will cover the basic historical outline of the earliest Roman interest and invasion of Britain with Julius Caesar, through settlement and Romanisation, until the withdraw of Roman troops in the early fifth century. In addition to the historical and political impact of the Romans, this module will also consider the cultural aspects of everyday life, women in the province, settlement and building projects, and the impact of Romanisation on the local cultures as well as the Romans living there themselves.

Introduction to Classical Roman Literature 15

This module provides the students with a general introduction to the main literary genres of the Classical Roman world. The timeframe considered is approximately from the third century BC to the fifth century AD (from the beginnings of Roman literature with Livius Andronicus to the literature of the Imperial age). This survey of literary material can include epic poetry, elegy, oratory, historiography, epigram, satire, and other major literary genres. The goal is for students to become familiar with the different forms of literature found in Classical Roman sources and to be able to identify the distinguishing elements of each literary genre. At the same time, this module provides the students with an opportunity to become familiar with the best-known practitioners of each literary genre in ancient Rome. The module may also make forays into how these literary forms influenced later writing in the Medieval, Renaissance, and modern world.

Introduction to Classical Theatre 15

This module examines and explores the origins and development of the main theatrical genres (tragedy, comedy and satyr drama) in Classical Athens. It discusses the origins of theatrical performative practices in ancient Greece and its relationship with the cult of the god Dionysus. Attention will be devoted to the religious aspects of the festivals within which the plays were performed and their competitive context. Furthermore, the module discusses and analyses the involvement of theatre with the political context of the Athenian polis in the fifth century BC. The wider role of theatre in society will be keenly emphasised, by looking at the extent to which theatre functioned as a form of political and ethical debate. Finally, the module considers the relationship between theatre and other literary genres, as well as the impact that Classical theatre had on later ages.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Reading Epic 15

Epic poetry had a pivotal role in the cultural, social, and political life of antiquity, and has had an enduring impact on the world’s cultural discourse across the ages. Students will read passages from the major Greek and Roman epic poems and follow some of the most widespread epic themes in their journey from the Bronze Age through the Roman Imperial era and on to the twenty-first century. Students will identify and discuss elements of continuity and innovation in the tradition, and focus on how epic literature was created, performed, and adapted in different contexts in order to create different national identities in antiquity, from archaic Greece to Imperial Rome. Furthermore, students may also consider various aspects of the reception of ancient epic through selected case studies.

Practising History 15

This module considers the planning and preparation of research and the methods and skills used, with particular reference to – but not sole consideration of – the dissertation. A wide range of historical approaches and methods are assessed, including use of local and national archives, databases and online sources, media and newspapers, visual images, standing remains, landscape and the material environment, public history, oral sources and scientific data. Ethics in historical research are also examined.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

 

  • The Glory of Athens and the Shadow of Sparta - 15 Credits
  • Alexander the Great: in his Own Time - 15 Credits
  • Rome: the Rise of the Eternal City - 15 Credits
  • Imperial Rome: Caesar and Augustus - 15 Credits
  • The Symposium: Ancient Greek Drinking Culture - 15 Credits
  • The Culture of Neoclassicism - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Introduction to the Classical Languages (Greek or Latin) - 15 Credits

 

Other Optional Modules:

  • The Investiture Contest - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology and Anthropology of Death and Burial - 15 Credits
  • The Vikings and the Frankish World - 15 Credits
  • The Renaissance Court: Power Politics and Patronage - 15 Credits
  • Climate, Culture and Catastrophe in the Modern World - 15 Credits
  • Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits
  • Exploring Teaching as a Career - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Reading Epic 15

Epic poetry had a pivotal role in the cultural, social, and political life of antiquity, and has had an enduring impact on the world’s cultural discourse across the ages. Students will read passages from the major Greek and Roman epic poems and follow some of the most widespread epic themes in their journey from the Bronze Age through the Roman Imperial era and on to the twenty-first century. Students will identify and discuss elements of continuity and innovation in the tradition, and focus on how epic literature was created, performed, and adapted in different contexts in order to create different national identities in antiquity, from archaic Greece to Imperial Rome. Furthermore, students may also consider various aspects of the reception of ancient epic through selected case studies.

Practising History 15

This module considers the planning and preparation of research and the methods and skills used, with particular reference to – but not sole consideration of – the dissertation. A wide range of historical approaches and methods are assessed, including use of local and national archives, databases and online sources, media and newspapers, visual images, standing remains, landscape and the material environment, public history, oral sources and scientific data. Ethics in historical research are also examined.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

 

  • The Glory of Athens and the Shadow of Sparta - 15 Credits
  • Alexander the Great: in his Own Time - 15 Credits
  • Rome: the Rise of the Eternal City - 15 Credits
  • Imperial Rome: Caesar and Augustus - 15 Credits
  • The Symposium: Ancient Greek Drinking Culture - 15 Credits
  • The Culture of Neoclassicism - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Introduction to the Classical Languages (Greek or Latin) - 15 Credits

 

Other Optional Modules:

  • The Investiture Contest - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology and Anthropology of Death and Burial - 15 Credits
  • The Vikings and the Frankish World - 15 Credits
  • The Renaissance Court: Power Politics and Patronage - 15 Credits
  • Climate, Culture and Catastrophe in the Modern World - 15 Credits
  • Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits
  • Exploring Teaching as a Career - 15 Credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

The Dissertation (Extended Independent Study) is an 8,000 -10,000 thesis on a subject of a student’s choice. It makes an original contribution to historical knowledge and understanding. It demonstrates an advanced capacity to work as a historian and to employ the conventions of a historian. Students must produce by due deadlines a proposal acceptable to internal scrutineers, evidence of substantial progress by the end of the first module as part of the assessment for the Research Methods module, and a record of supervision completed by the supervisor with the Dissertation.

Writing History 15

This module is taught through small seminar groups only. In these groups, students will be able to explore the nature of historical research and historical debate through reflection on their own dissertation and the sharing of best practice with other students. It will allow a more supportive learning environment whilst ensuring a more active engagement with individual research.

History and the Public Sphere 15

This module asks students to critically engage with the dual meaning of ‘public history’: how the past is represented to the wider public and how historians can contribute to a range of contemporary conversations. It considers how history is communicated and consumed by the general public outside academe through such institutions as museums, archives and heritage sites, as well as in television, film, and the wider media.  It will investigate the various reasons why history has been co-opted for politics, education, entertainment and profit, and whether this amounts to a distortion of the past. Finally, students will be asked to consider how their studies can contribute to the field of public history. In doing so, students will develop a more nuanced understanding of both popular and academic approaches to the past and to consider the applicability of academic history to a variety of popular arenas.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • Depth Study: Pax Romana: Dynastic Stories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Herodotus: Tall Tales and Epic Histories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Literature - 30 Credits
  • Games & Gladiators - 15 Credits
  • Murder in the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Summer Studies in Athens or Rome - 15 Credits
  • Classical World in Film - 15 Credits
  • Plutarch and his Great Lives - 15 Credits
  • The Fall of the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Greco-Roman Egypt 331-31 BC - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: the Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits

Other Optional Modules:

  • Medieval Hostageships - 15 Credits
  • Apocalypse Then and Now! Disasters in World History - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Dissertation 30

The Dissertation (Extended Independent Study) is an 8,000 -10,000 thesis on a subject of a student’s choice. It makes an original contribution to historical knowledge and understanding. It demonstrates an advanced capacity to work as a historian and to employ the conventions of a historian. Students must produce by due deadlines a proposal acceptable to internal scrutineers, evidence of substantial progress by the end of the first module as part of the assessment for the Research Methods module, and a record of supervision completed by the supervisor with the Dissertation.

Writing History 15

This module is taught through small seminar groups only. In these groups, students will be able to explore the nature of historical research and historical debate through reflection on their own dissertation and the sharing of best practice with other students. It will allow a more supportive learning environment whilst ensuring a more active engagement with individual research.

History and the Public Sphere 15

This module asks students to critically engage with the dual meaning of ‘public history’: how the past is represented to the wider public and how historians can contribute to a range of contemporary conversations. It considers how history is communicated and consumed by the general public outside academe through such institutions as museums, archives and heritage sites, as well as in television, film, and the wider media.  It will investigate the various reasons why history has been co-opted for politics, education, entertainment and profit, and whether this amounts to a distortion of the past. Finally, students will be asked to consider how their studies can contribute to the field of public history. In doing so, students will develop a more nuanced understanding of both popular and academic approaches to the past and to consider the applicability of academic history to a variety of popular arenas.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • Depth Study: Pax Romana: Dynastic Stories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Herodotus: Tall Tales and Epic Histories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Literature - 30 Credits
  • Games & Gladiators - 15 Credits
  • Murder in the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Summer Studies in Athens or Rome - 15 Credits
  • Classical World in Film - 15 Credits
  • Plutarch and his Great Lives - 15 Credits
  • The Fall of the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Greco-Roman Egypt 331-31 BC - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: the Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits

Other Optional Modules:

  • Medieval Hostageships - 15 Credits
  • Apocalypse Then and Now! Disasters in World History - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Printing and Binding
The University is pleased to offer our students a free printing allowance of £20 each academic year. This will print around 500 A4 mono pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing. Our Reprographics team also offer printing and binding services, including dissertation binding which may be required by your course with an indicative coast of £1.50-£3.

Optional

Core texts
Multiple copies of course material are held in the library or are available on-line. Some students might prefer to buy copies of texts for themselves with an approximate cost of £100 if bought new over the course of a year (but texts can often be purchased at considerably reduced rates second hand). Cost £100 per year.

Dissertation work
Students working on dissertations in Year 3 may incur costs (mainly travel) of visiting archives, dependent upon the specific nature of the dissertation and availability of online resources for a specific subject. This would typically involve either travel to a local archive (e.g. Southampton, Portsmouth or further afield if the student chooses to study a locality away from Winchester) or a national archive, usually in London (TNA, British Library, Women's Library, etc.). If the dissertation work is based in Winchester then costs will be far less.

Field Trip
Optional week long History Fieldtrip in Year 2 - costs vary depending on location and number of students going on the trip. Costs vary between £300-£700.

Placement
If students decide to complete an optional History Work/Volunteering Placement it may incur travel costs, which are dependent upon where the student undertakes the placement (if local it may be zero, but costs go up when public transport is used to travel). Students will have a say in where their placement is located. £0 - £300, dependent on location of placement and number of visits required.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
48N3
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester