Find out more about the subject specific sessions available through the University of Winchester.

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Our Expert Experience sessions are designed to deliver specific subject insight to your students.

Please review opportunities from the following subject areas below. If there is a specific area you would like, please feel free to get in touch.

Anthropology and Archaeology

Human evolution: exploring our origins

Explore fossil discoveries of a variety of hominin species including Australopithecus (Lucy), early Homo species in Africa, and the Neanderthals of Eurasia, before discussing their place in the human family tree. This will include a handling session with casts of fossil skulls.

Type of Activity: Talk and practical session
Relevant Subjects: Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

Humna bioarchaeology: interpreting evidence from skeletal remains

The study of human remains can tell us a lot about an individual and aid in our understanding of the lives of people in the past. Using archaeological skeletal remains in our university laboratory we will demonstrate how to determine age-at-death, sex, and stature as well as discussing human variation and evidence for disease and trauma that can be seen on the skeleton.

Type of Activity: Practical session on-campus in the science lab
Relevant Subjects: Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff


Material Worlds

We are surrounded by material objects in our everyday lives. From our everyday clothing choices to our most valued personal possessions, objects of material culture are an important window into our lives and how we understand the world around us. In this talk we will look at how anthropologists have used examples from around the world, and from closer to home, to gain insights into how material objects shape our relationships with other people and how they inform and express our identities.

Type of Activity: Classroom based talk
Relevant Subjects: Sociology, History, Philosophy
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

The Origins of Conflict and Warfare

There are many models about why conflict exists between individuals and particularly between groups, which we often call warfare. These come from history, anthropology/sociology and psychology, and often argue for universals of human behaviour or base themselves in modern-day ethnographic or primate observations. Surprisingly, there is a significant body of evidence from prehistoric archaeology, going back many thousands of years, which is often side-lined, yet is highly relevant to this fundamental question.

Type of Activity: Classroom based talk
Relevant Subjects: Sociology, History, Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

See the BA (Hons) Anthropology and Archaeology course page for more information

Childhood Studies

Listening to Babbling Babies

Using ideas from attachment theory, this talk gives some examples of the value in allowing babies to lead communication and as adults how we respond and return the interactive dance of dialogue.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Psychology, BTEC Early Years, Diploma in Child Care
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

See the BA (Hons) Childhood Studies course page for more information

Classical Studies and Ancient History

Who was Homer?

Homer is one of the most famous poets from ancient Greece and his Iliad and Odyssey still inspire art, films and novels today. But who was Homer? Did he ever even exist? Was he the poor, blind, and wandering poet described in the ancient sources? In this session, we will consider texts and images about his life from the ancient to the modern age, and explore how and why the divine bard Homer influences our contemporary culture.

Type of Activity: Classroom based talk
Relevant Subjects: Classical Civilisation, History, Greek, Latin, Ancient History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Did Nero really fiddle whilst Rome burned? Reading Historical Sources Critically

Everyone knows three things about Nero - that he didn't get along with his mother, tortured Christians in the Colisseum, and fiddled whilst Rome burned down around him. But, did he really do all these bad things? And if he didn't where did these stories come from? Why are people so ready to believe such stories? And if he were so bad, how come he was greatly admired by the lower classes in Rome and the Greeks of his time, and by the princes of the later Renaissance? In this session, we'll talk about the reign of the emperor Nero -- especially in terms of the sources of the time that recount his reign and that shape our current perception of Nero. While the Hollywood version of Nero is always entertaining, our job as historians is to examine the original sources carefully. How can we put together both written sources and material sources material remains (statues, coins, &c) to re-evaluate objectively Nero's reign?

Type of Activity: Classroom based talk and activity
Relevant Subjects: Classical Civilisation, Classics, Ancient History, General European History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

See the BA (Hons) Ancient Classical and Medieval Studies course page for more information

Education Studies

What is inclusive education?

What does it mean to be included in education? Is our education inclusive just because we are treated equally or that we can all access the same classroom? Or do we need to be treated as distinct individuals in order to be genuinely included? This talk explores a range of theories and philosophies that help to extend our understanding of inclusion in education.

Type of Activity: Classroom based talk
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy, Sociology, Religion and Ethics, Health and Social Care, Child Development
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

Values and Rights on the Internet

In everyday life, we have basic human rights and values that organise society. We also have rights and values that steer our lives in the online world. But are children or adults even aware of their rights? How can education respond to the challenges of the digital world to make sure we have a safe, inclusive society? For example, how can we protect our right to the truth in an era of fake news and deep fakes?

Type of Activity: Classroom based game and discussion
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy, Religion and Ethics, Sociology, Childhood Development, Computing, ICT
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

See the BA (Hons) Education Studies course page for more information

Forensic Investigation

Forensic Entomology

Students will collect blow fly larvae (maggots) from an outdoor "crime scene", then review the larvae in the laboratory, before identifying them to species. Students will then estimate a minimum time since death based on species and temperature data.

Type of Activity: Practical session involving outdoor work and lab work requiring stereo microscopes (we can accommodate 30 students in the university laboratory)
Relevant Subjects: Biology / Forensic Science
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

Forensic Hair Comparison

We will provide a library of animal and human hair samples to view under the microscope and a 'crime sample' and the students need to work out who the offender is. The session can discuss features of human and animal hairs and the comparative features used in forensic analysis.

Type of Activity: Lab based session with slide microscopes
Relevant Subjects: Biology / Forensic Science / Other Science
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

See the BSc (Hons) Forensic Investigation course page for more information

Geography

The geopolitics of Africa’s engagements with China

The African continent is usually depicted as largely peripheral to the main forces of change in global politics. In this talk, we will explore the impact of on-going dramatic geopolitical shifts in global governance that are leading to the emergence of a “multi-polar” world and, specifically, the rise of China. Has this led to the opening of spaces for manoeuvre for a variety of geopolitical agents in Africa? Or, does this constitute a new 'scramble' for African resources?

Type of Activity: Classroom based
Relevant Subjects: Geography, Politics, Sociology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5 (All Level 3 students)

Managing the water cycle in a changing climate

This session will include a short presentation on the interrelatedness of the water cycle, carbon cycle and biodiversity based on our academic research on hydrology and 'natural flood management'. This will include considering climate change, flood risk, functional ecosystem restoration and catchment management. This will also consider the interface between human and physical actions that affect this management.

Type of Activity: Classroom based
Relevant Subjects: Geography, Applied Science
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5 (All Level 3 students)

See the BSc (Hons) Geography course page for more information

Health, Community & Social Care

Understanding the importance of diversity through your own cultural assumptions

This taster session will provide students with an insight into contemporary culture and the communities in which we live. During the session we will examine related rituals of one cultural group in order to question our own cultural awareness, assumptions, and worldview. The main objective is to understand how our own “cultural worldview” informs different cultural perceptions and understandings of each other. Knowing how we see and act in the world is vital when working in people facing professions.

Type of Activity: Classroom based
Relevant Subjects: Health and Social Care, Psychology, Sociology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5 (All Level 3 students)

Health and Social Care through the window young people and inequality

This session will provide a short overview of our Health and Social care degree. We'll then use the case studies of young people to introduce participants to some of the key elements of the study of health and social care. First, we'll consider the role of evidence in health inequality in our 'be the difference’ focus. Second, we'll begin to explore inequalities in health in the UK and in relation to young people in particular. There will be opportunities to interact throughout and we'll finish with a further opportunity for discussion and questions. By the end of the session, participants will:

1. Known the key elements of the Health and Social Care degree,
2. Appreciate of the role of evidence in health,
3. Understand what is meant by health inequality.

Type of Activity: Classroom based
Relevant Subjects: Health and Social Care, Psychology, Sociology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5 (All Level 3 students)

See the BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care course page for more information

History

Richard III and the Princes in the Tower

Richard III is one of history's great villains. Though king for only two year, his reign began under a cloud of suspicion regarding the fate of his nephews and ended with him becoming the last English king to die on the battlefield. This talk will consider the importance of Richard III in English history, whether his reign was truly the end of the Middle Ages and how myths surrounding his reign have developed.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Was Henry VII a successful king?

Popular perceptions of Henry see him as a skilful diplomat and as restoring strong royal government. This talk will challenge such assumptions and suggest a different interpretation of Henry, as a king who struggled in his foreign policy and whose domestic policies were unpopular and problematic.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

The Personal is Political: Second Wave Feminism and Women’s Lives

Popular perceptions of the history of feminism often privilege the Suffragettes, as the most influential feminist movement of the twentieth century in Britain. Yet, arguably, the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1970s can be understood as creating a more significant shift in women’s position in society. This session will explore the aims, tactics and legacy of Second Wave Feminism and consider the significance of the movement for British women in the second half of the twentieth century.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

History for our Times; Historians, Climate Change and the Current Environmental Crisis

How are historians contributing to contemporary debates about climate change and environmental crisis? How are these changing the way we think about the past, reassessing the impact of industrialisation, empire and how we live our lives? This session will consider the value of history, as a subject and a way of thinking about the relationship between the past, present, and future, to some of the most urgent issues we face today.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

What is genocide?

Genocide has affected humanity throughout its existence, many factors, including the upheavals caused by climate change and the rise of authoritarian governments around the world, legitimise concerns that genocides might occur in this century, too. This session will discuss a range of 19th and 20th century examples to explore what constitutes genocide, how past genocides happened, who perpetrated them, and their impact on victim communities. In thus doing, the session introduces fundamental current questions of genocide prevention and, when prevention fails, restorative justice.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Life in a ‘Gilded Cage’ at the Renaissance Court

What was it like to be a courtier at the Renaissance court, mixing with and serving royalty? This session will examine the weighty expectations placed on courtiers in terms of how they should act and behave in an environment where reputation was everything. It will also reveal the challenge of navigating the court, a place riven with factions, high politics, gossip and rumour—getting it wrong could see you expelled from court or worse, if you fell foul of the monarch, ending up in prison or on the block.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Image is Everything: Crafting the image of the ‘perfect’ queen

As the first woman in the realm, queens were expected to be ‘practically perfect in every way’ and live up the high expectations of their behaviour, serving as models of ideal womanhood to their subjects. This session will discuss the ideals and expectations of premodern queens—looking at examples of royal women across the globe from the medieval and early modern periods. We will then look at how queens created an image which met these lofty ideals, focusing particularly on display and visual depictions including their dress, jewels and portraits. We’ll also think about queens who were successful at creating a positive legacy and those who went wrong and ended up with a ‘black legend’.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

The East Anglian Witch Hunt, 1645-47

In the midst of the English Civil Wars, Matthew Hopkins (a.k.a the Witchfinder General) and his assistant John Stearne, embarked on a witch-hunt that toured throughout East Anglia and far exceeded any other grouping of witch trials in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in both its ferocity and scale. Instead, the East Anglian trials bore far more resemblance to the more extensive and violent hunts witnessed in mainland Europe. This talk explores the reasons and motivations behind these trials and what they can tell us about popular perceptions of the civil wars.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

The Cult of the Dead in the Later Medieval England

The late medieval period is often described as the 'Cult of the Dead' where the relationship between the living and dead was close. This has many physical expressions and can also be seen in documentary sources. This session will consider how the medieval dead can be viewed today and the underlying belief structures. The lecture will outline these beliefs, look at physical evidence, such as churches and tombs, while also considering documents such as contemporary wills.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: History
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

See the BA (Hons) History course page for more information

Liberal Arts

The Sound of Music

Why is music so powerful? How can it have such beauty and meaning in our lives yet also be a tool for manipulation and control? For the ancient philosopher Plato music or harmony was the first principle of the universe and of justice in society. Through the study of music, maths, astronomy and philosophy one learned to understand and live this harmony. But society is not harmonious and there is great injustice in the world. What, then, does our music tell us about the sort of society we live in or the sorts of human beings that we are? Should we heed Plato’s warnings and be more careful with what we listen to? From Pythagoras and Plato to Beethoven and Kate Tempest this session explores the power of music to speak to the emotional, intellectual, political and spiritual life of being human.

Type of Activity: Seminar talk – classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Humanities: Philosophy, Religion and Ethics, Sociology, Music, Politics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

Justice in Plato’s Republic

What does Plato mean by justice in his famous book The Republic? And why is it so relevant for the current political era of Trump, Johnson, and the rise of so-called populism? Can Plato still offer an educational model that will speak to social justice in a divided world?

Type of Activity: Seminar talk – classroom session or 30 minute lecture
Relevant Subjects: Humanities: Philosophy, Religion and Ethics, Sociology, Politics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

The Filmosophy of Christopher Nolan

Christopher Nolan has created some of the most successful, provocative, and thoughtful cinema of the 21st Century. In this session we will explore the philosophical questions raised by his films, including the Batman trilogy, Inception, and Memento. We will ask, where do ideas come from? How important is memory to our identity? How best to combat crime? Is Batman really a force for good? And are our dreams just another reality? We will explore these questions by looking at what prominent thinkers and philosophers have to say.

Type of Activity: Classroom session with Film Clips
Relevant Subjects: Liberal Arts, Philosophy, Media Studies, Journalism, Film
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

The Power of Stories: from Spoken Word to Homer

What do Kate Tempest, Kanye West and George the Poet have in common with Homer or Shakespeare? How do Kendrick Lamar, Lauryn Hill and Lin Manuel-Miranda echo the voices of some of the oldest storytellers or “stitchers-together-of-songs”? One thing they all have in common is that their tradition is an oral one. In telling stories, cultures have passed on and challenged ideas, truths and values about who we are, where we come from and how we are to live. In this session we will ask why telling stories is still so important to us, who the best story tellers today might be and whether stories have any sort of political power.

Type of Activity: Option 1: Talk – classroom session with Audio/Film clips Option 2: Workshop Talk - classroom session with creative storytelling participatory/exercises
Relevant Subjects: Liberal Arts, English Literature, Poetry, Media/Cultural Studies, Music
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

Digital and Democracy

Democratic governance is one of the oldest modes of governance, first appearing in Ancient Greece. Many 21st century societies still run under democratic conditions but are increasingly vulnerable to digital technologies. When our power to vote is directly influenced by companies, parties, and countries acting through algorithms is our ability to make our own decisions still under our own control? From fake news to AI how are digital environments impacting our very real physical lives?

Type of Activity: Classroom Session
Relevant Subjects: Liberal Arts, Digital Humanities, Politics, Media Studies
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

Science Fiction: Dystopian Dangers

Years and Years has been taking a black mirror approach to the family drama. No other programme feels more disturbingly and painfully relevant. It is, like the most powerful scholarly work, sweeping and specific. Popular dystopian drama has rarely highlighted the dangers of our current relationship to technology and each other so clearly while also showing so powerfully how our past has brought us here and where it will lead us. This session takes a sweeping tour of science fiction writing including Frankenstein, We, 1984, Brave New World, Utopia, Black Mirror, and Years and Years and ask what is the uncanny valley trying to teach us?

Type of Activity: Classroom Session with film clips
Relevant Subjects: Liberal Arts, Philosophy, Media Studies, Literature
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

See the BA (Hons) Liberal Arts course page for more information

Marketing

Intricate Nature of Buying Behaviour

As consumers we are constantly making purchases that fulfil our needs, one of the driving forces behind this is marketing. We will explore this by filling out a consumption log template based on previous purchases and discuss how the purchase was made. Students can choose something expensive/important such as a smartphone, trainers, etc. or anything cheap/not important such as coffee, chocolate, etc. Students will compare and contrast their consumption experiences with peers.

Type of Activity: Classroom based Consumer Behaviour Seminar
Relevant Subjects: Marketing, Business
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

See the BA (Hons) Marketing course page for more information

Psychology

Who are the psychopaths amongst us?

What is psychopathy and who can we classify as ‘psychopathic’? What is the more modern approach to psychopathic personality science and how does this help us treat antisocial personality disorders? This interactive talk will run through themes of personality, neurology and social behaviour in the context of criminal and antisocial behaviour.

Type of Activity: Classroom Session
Relevant Subjects: Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Adolescents' emotional competence and how it affects learning

This would be a talk involving some applied exercises examining adolescents’ emotional competence and considering the role of emotional competence in learning.

Type of Activity: Classroom Session
Relevant Subjects: Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Access to justice for child witnesses with and without autism

This talk will consider the nature of Autism and how child witnesses with and without autism can be supported to give their best evidence during a police interview and identification lineup in order to ensure that they achieve access to justice

Type of Activity: Classroom Session
Relevant Subjects: Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Ethics in Research

Our concepts of ethics have been derived from religions, philosophies and cultures and shape many debates in society. This session will provide an introduction to considering morals and ethics, with an examination of ethics within psychological research. Suitable for students from Y10 upwards, this class-based activity lasts for about 30 min.

Type of Activity: Virtual, classroom based (students in own learning environment)
Relevant Subjects: RE, Philosophy, Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

How does music make us feel?

Music plays an important role in the lives of people all over the world, and people listen to music as a way to set the mood, to motivate a workout, or even to gain inspiration. This introductory session focuses on what is music? Why do we like it? Why is pop music so popular? This is suitable for all music fans but particularly for Key Stage 5 students, the session would require 45 – 60 min.

Type of Activity: Virtual, classroom based (students in own learning environment)
Relevant Subjects: Psychology, Music
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

Creative Psychology

Does every human being have creative potential? This experience will look at what is creative psychology and learners will take part in tasks to encourage them to think more creatively. This is ideally offered as a classroom-based activity for an average class group.         

Type of Activity: Classroom based (students in own learning environment)
Relevant Subjects: Psychology, Creative subjects
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Health Psychology

Health psychologists use their knowledge of psychology and health to promote well-being and understand physical illness. This class-based activity for up to approx. 30 pupils is designed for those who are studying Psychology as part of their Level 3 or Access course study. It will consider what is health psychology? How can we help others to make healthier choices?         

Type of Activity: Classroom based (students in own learning environment)
Relevant Subjects: Psychology, Health & Social Care
Suitable Audience:  Key Stage 5

How is our personality formed?

Psychologists studying personality have had no shortage of theories about how it develops and how it affects an individual. Our personality is what makes us unique individuals. Within this experience there will be a consideration of what is personality? What makes us unique or similar to others? Who are we really? What is the dark triad of personality?         

Type of Activity: Classroom based
Relevant Subjects: Psychology, or as an enrichment session for a broad mix of learners
Suitable Audience:  Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5

See the BSc (Hons) Psychology course page for more information

Sport, Exercise and Health

Biomechanics and Bionic Legs: The Future of Rehabilitation

This session will start with a brief overview of what biomechanics is. The main section of this session will then concentrate on how we can use biomechanics in a clinical setting to enhance rehabilitation techniques in special populations, with a focus on those who are recovering from strokes.

Type of Activity: Classroom session, virtual, (on or off campus)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Physics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Physical Activity Psychology: Motivating People to Move

This session will examine the difference between physical activity and exercise, as well as consider how active we should be. During the session we will also examine problems associated with inactivity, alongside the benefits of being physically active. There will then be a discussion about interventions to get people active.

Type of Activity: Classroom session, virtual, (on or off campus)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Psychology, Sociology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Power and Velocity: Implications for Training

Within this session students will examine the effect of additional load to power output. Specifically, students will perform a jump with varying loads, with the velocity and power of the jumps measured. We will then discuss the effect load has on power output and use this to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of athletes, as well as training for power.

Type of Activity:  Practical (on campus or potentially in your own gym)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Biology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Psychology of Sports Teams: Exploring Conflict

Ever been in a team with tension? Differences of opinion? This session will consider the causes and outcomes of conflict in teams, as well as discuss examples of conflict in elite sport. It will also involve exploring applied strategies that might help people to manage conflict. In addition, this session will consider qualitative methods that have been used in research we have undertaken to examine team conflict.

Type of Activity:  Classroom session, virtual, (on or off campus)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Psychology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Assessing the Stretch Shortening Cycle: Implications for Training

Most powerful activities involve a countermovement during which the muscles involved are first stretched and then shortened to accelerate the body or limb. This session will examine the stretch shortening cycle and how well students use it while jumping. Here, students will perform two types of jump, before examining differences in the stretch shortening cycle and concentric strength. We will then discuss implications this has for training athletes.

Type of Activity: Practical (on or off campus)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Biology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

Virtual Tour of the Biomechanics Laboratory

We are excellently equipped for Biomechanics, with a great range of specialist apparatus. Before the tour begins there will be a brief overview of what biomechanics is and why we are so interested in its study. The main section of this session will then comprise of a virtual tour of our biomechanics laboratory. Considering the types of equipment we use and how we apply them in a sport and exercise setting.

Type of Activity: Virtual (students in own learning environment)
Relevant Subjects: BTEC Sport, PE, Physics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5

See the BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science course page for more information

Theology, Religion and Ethics. Philosophy, Religion and Ethics

Sociology of Death

This talk gives a brief overview of some of the main ways of thinking sociologically about death (with a little anthropology) and relates these to memorials

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: RS, Sociology
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Post-Holocaust Theodicy

This session explores 4 very different theodicies and a philosophy in regard to thinking about the theodicy (the goodness of G-d) in Judaism post the Shoah/Holocaust. All 5 ways of thinking about G-d in this talk are Jewish. The content is unsetting due to the nature of the Shoah

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: RS, Philosophy and Ethics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Political Anatomy - The Metaphor of the Body in Political Philosophy

At the border of philosophy, politics and literature, we'll look at how metaphors of the body are used to justify particular political orders. From the head of state and the arm of the law, to parasites, cancers and surgical operations, a series of metaphors that impose an organic model on society can be traced from Aesop's Fables and through Hobbes' Leviathan to contemporary society. Looking at visual images, fables, speeches and philosophical texts we'll see how ideology works to justify and critique particular social orders.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy and Ethics; Politics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

What is a Thing? Forms of Identity and the Three Things You Are 

The apparently simple question of identity - when is a thing the same thing as another thing - leads to several philosophical paradoxes. For example, whether the Ship of Theseus remained the same ship after its planks had been replaced one by one until none of the original materials remained. In this session, we will look at a number of these peculiar paradoxes. Our path will lead us to John Locke's surprising judgment that we humans we need to be understood in terms of three separate identities - as material objects, as animals and as persons. We will see how his argument that we need to be understood as persons, not just animals, was rooted in theological speculations about the Last Judgment and how this continues to shape our modern notion of personhood.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy and Ethics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Exploring the Gaze - The Ethical Importance of Being Looked at in the Instagram Age

One thing our standard modern ethical theories (deontology, consequentialism, virtue ethics, emotivism) have tended to ignore is the key role that being looked at and feeling shame plays in ethical experience. In this talk we'll look at some of the ways that shame has been condemned and rehabilitated in recent philosophy. We'll focus particularly on how some recent philosophers have turned to considering more unusual gazes, such as the experience of being looked at by an animal or by a photograph of someone who is dead. Do these uncanny gazes have a particular ethical importance that modern philosophy has ignored? We will also consider how our selfie culture and obsessive urge to photograph and share our life on sites like Instagram might be interpreted as philosophically and ethically illuminating.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy and Ethics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Religion and Clothing

This looks at outer and underwear in a selection of religions and considers the Islamic Veil as well as the history of Fashion and its connection with Judaism in some detail.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy and Ethics, Textiles
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Gender and the Environment

This talk explores how 'nature' has generally been gendered as female and the potential implication so this; it takes a historical and philosophical. This is not a science based talk; it's humanities but would be of potential interest to students wishing to gain a wider perspective on the environment.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Religious Studies, Geography, Environmental Studies
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff, Parents

Reinventing ourselves?

The ethics of enhancing human nature. Sciences like genetics, brain science and AI promise more and more ways to modify the functioning of our bodies and minds. Many of these technologies could be used both to treat diseases and to enhance healthy people's functions and abilities above 'normal' levels. Some people even look forward to a 'transhuman' or 'posthuman' future when we will have enhanced ourselves so massively that we become a new - and better - species altogether. But should we try to do these things? In this presentation we'll look at what might be at stake ethically in human enhancement, and explore contrasting answers from secular and religious ethical thinkers.

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy, Religious Studies, some EPQ projects, and students taking science and technology subjects who are interested in the ethical and social implications
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 4, Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

Not guilty - my brain made me do it!

Are our decisions, thoughts and actions just the result of the physical activity of our brains - much of which we might not even be conscious of? If our thoughts and actions are simply caused by brain activity, does that mean we don't truly have free will? Does that in turn mean we are not morally responsible for our actions, and don't deserve to be praised, blamed, rewarded or punished? In this presentation we'll explore what neuroscientists, psychologists, philosophers and theologians have to say about these questions. Some of the answers might turn out to be quite a surprise...

Type of Activity: Classroom session
Relevant Subjects: Philosophy, Religious Studies, Psychology, possibly Biology and Law, some EPQ topics
Suitable Audience: Key Stage 5, School/College Staff

See the BA (Hons) Theology, Religion and Ethics course page for more information

Future Students

Head of Future Students
Susan Henderson

Future Students Officer
Laura Lincoln

Schools & Colleges Senior Development Officers
Ruth Boyce
Alix Hickman
Lucy McDonagh
Alison Wilson

Schools & Colleges Development Officer
Jessie Concannon

Widening Participation

Director of Widening Participation
Sarah-Louise Collins

Access and Outreach Coordinators
William Kelly
Lauren Smith-Birch

Contact our Future Students team

Email:
schoolsandcolleges@winchester.ac.uk

Telephone:
+44 (0) 1962 827543

Twitter:
@UoWSCL

Contact our Widening Participation team

Email:
wp@winchester.ac.uk

Telephone:
+44 (0) 1962 826474

Twitter:
@UWINAspire